Traditional Sweet Recipes

Oh for the joys that war has past, with the freedom that comes with the end to rationing, no longer having to feed on the staple items but can now again enjoy the luxuries of all thing sweet. The following recipes come from 1952.

Marzipan

Truffles

Fudges

Caramels

Toffee-making

Fondants & Coconut Ice

Humbugs, Barley Sugar

Marzipan Sweets

Picture of hand made sweets

Real marzipan made with ground almonds – when these are obtainable – is of course the best, but a mock marzipan can by made with soya flour. Flavour and tint it then mould and cut.

Marzipan made with Almonds

  • 8ozs ground almonds
  • 8ozs icing sugar
  • 1 egg
  • ½ teaspoonful vanilla essence
  • ½ teaspoonful orange flower water
  • juice of ½ a lemon

Mix the ground almonds and icing sugar together. Beat the egg slightly and add it to the dry ingredients, with the flavouring essences and lemon juice. Mix to a paste, and kneed it thoroughly.

Mock Marzipan made with Soya

  • 4ozs margarine
  • 6ozs sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • A few drops of almond essence
  • 10ozs soya flour

Put the margarine, sugar and water into a pan and bring to the boil, stirring, the remove from the heat. Add the almond essence and gradually stir in the soya flour. Turn the mixture on to a board and knead it until the paste is a smooth texture.

Two-colour Marzipan Triangles

Make some marzipan, divide it into two portions and tint each a different colour. Form one piece into a strip 1½ inches wide, and make the other into a triangular-shaped bar. Place the bar along the center of the strip and press the latter along the sides of the bar, keeping the whole a good shape. Cut into slices about ½ inch thick.

Harlequin Squares

Colour several portions of marzipan different shades, e.g., pink, green and chocolate. Roll out the strips and place on top of one another. Press them well together, trim the edges, then cut into squares. The trimmings can be rolled together to make attractive ball-shaped sweets.

Cherry Marzipan Balls

Cut 2oz glace cherries into small pieces and knead them into 6oz almond paste, leaving a few for decoration. Shape the paste into balls and roll these in the remaining chopped cherries. Put them in paper cases and leave them to harden slightly.

Marzipan Fruits

Mould the marzipan into the desired shapes with the fingers, and colour them by using edible vegetable colourings applied with a paint-brush. To give a more realistic finish to strawberries and raspberries, roll them in fine sugar. The stalk of a clove can be used to represent the calyx of an apple or pear.

Stuffed Dates

Choose good quality dessert dates. Remove the stones and fill the cavity with marzipan, tinted different shades. Place them in paper cases.

Mock Almond Paste

  • 1oz margarine
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 teaspoon almond essence
  • 2ozs sugar
  • 2ozs soya flour or fine semolina

Put the margarine, water and essence in a small pan and heat gently till the margarine has melted. Stir in the sugar and soya flour or semolina. Knead well.

Truffles

This term covers a variety of delicious, soft centered sweets, generally uncooked, which are shaped into balls and coated with cocoa, chocolate vermicelli, etc., to resemble natural truffles. The centers are made of a special mixture or marzipan, fondant or chocolate.

Rum Truffles

  • ½lb slab of chocolate
  • 1 tablespoonful condensed milk
  • 1 few drops of rum
  • Chocolate vermicelli

Melt the chocolate, stirring all the time, then add the milk and rum. Beat well, and put in a cold place until it is stiff enough to handle. Form the mixture into small balls and roll them in chocolate vermicelli. Put the truffles into paper cases.

Rich Chocolate Truffles

  • 3ozs chocolate
  • 1 egg yolk
  • ½oz butter
  • 1 teaspoonful evaporated milk
  • 1 teaspoon rum
  • Chocolate powder

Melt the chocolate over hot water, add the egg yolk, butter, milk and rum. Beat until the mixture is thick and pasty, then form it into balls and roll these in chocolate powder.

Chocolate Truffles

  • 3ozs plain chocolate
  • 4 level tablespoonfuls powdered chocolate
  • 1oz margarine
  • 1 tablespoonful milk
  • 1 few drops of vanilla essence
  • About two tablespoonfuls chocolate nibs

Cut the plain chocolate into small pieces, put it into a medium-sized basin and add the milk. Put the basin over a pan of boiling water and melt the chocolate in the milk. Take the basin off the heat and beat in the margarine. Cool the mixture, beating it all the time, then stir in the powdered chocolate and vanilla essence. Have the chocolate nibs ready on a piece of paper. Take a level teaspoonful of the truffle mixture, coat it thoroughly with the chocolate nibs, then form it into a ball with the hands. The mixture should be stiff enough to hold its shape and it will stiffen further when it is left to set. The mixture makes about twenty truffles. Arrange them in small paper sweet cases.

Coffee Truffles

  • 8ozs fondant
  • 2-3 teaspoonfuls coffee essence
  • 2 teaspoonfuls condensed milk
  • 4 tablespoonfuls ground almonds
  • Desiccated coconut

Put the fondant into a basin and melt it over hot water, then add the coffee essence and milk and remove it from the heat. Continue stirring until the mixture stiffens, and add the ground almonds. Form into small balls and roll them in desiccated coconut.

Milky Truffles

  • ¼ pint sweetened condensed milk (undiluted)
  • 1 tablespoonful cocoa
  • 1oz margarine
  • 1-2oz cake or biscuit crumbs
  • 1oz raisins, dates or figs
  • Chocolate powder or chocolate vermicelli to coat

Put the milk, cocoa and margarine in a pan and heat gently, stirring until well blended. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the crumbs and the chopped dried fruit. When the mixture is firm enough to handle roll into balls the size of a large marble and dust with the chocolate powder, or roll them in chocolate vermicelli. Put them into paper cases.

Nut Truffles

  • 1oz chocolate
  • 4ozs marzipan
  • 1 tablespoonful finely chopped or ground nuts
  • 2-3 drops vanilla essence
  • ½ teaspoon sherry (optional)
  • Chocolate powder

Melt the chocolate and mix into the marzipan. Knead in the nuts, essence and sherry, if used. Form into small balls and roll them in a little chocolate powder.

Fudges

Picture of hand made fudge

Fudge with its characteristic soft texture, is one of the most popular of all home-made sweets, and can be varied to suit all tastes.

Chocolate Fudge

  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • ½ pint fresh milk (or ¼ pint water and ¼ pint milk)
  • 1oz cocoa
  • 1 teaspoonful glucose
  • 2 tablespoonfuls cream (optional)
  • 2ozs butter
  • ½ teaspoonful vanilla essence

Dissolve the sugar in the milk, add all the remaining ingredients except the essence, and bring to the boil, stirring all the time. Heat to a temperature of 240°F, add the essence and remove the pan from the heat. Beat the mixture until it is thick and creamy, then pour it into a greased tin measuring about 6 x 8 inches. When it is nearly set, mark it into squares with a sharp knife. When cold turn out.

Coffee and Nut Fudge

  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • ½ pint evaporated milk
  • 2 tablespoonfuls coffee essence
  • 1oz butter
  • 4ozs chopped walnuts
  • 1 teaspoonful vanilla essence

Put all the ingredients, except the nut and vanilla essence, in a pan and bring to 240°F, stirring all the time. Remove pan from heat, add chopped nuts and essence and beat well, till mixture is thick and creamy. Pour into a greased tin and cut into squares.

Date Fudge

  • 1lb sugar
  • 2ozs margarine
  • ¼ pint evaporated milk
  • ¼ pint water
  • A few drops of vanilla essence
  • 3ozs finely chopped dates

Put the sugar, margarine, evaporated milk and water in a pan; dissolve the sugar and melt the margarine, then bring the mixture to a temperature of 240°F. Remove it from the heat, add the essence and dates, and beat the mixture very well, until the fudge is thick and creamy. Pour it into a greased tin and leave it to cool place to set. Cut it into neat squares with a sharp knife.
Chocolate Date Fudge may be made by adding chopped dated to the chocolate fudge mixture given in the previous recipe.

Honey Fudge

  • 4ozs honey
  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoonfuls water
  • ⅛ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 2 egg whites, stiffly beaten
  • ½ teaspoonful vanilla essence

Put the honey, sugar, water and cream of tartar into a pan, bring slowly to the boil and heat gently until a temperature of 260°F is reached. Pour the boiling syrup slowly on to the stiffly beaten egg whites, beating vigorously. Add essence and continue beating until mixture is very thick, then pour into an oiled tin and leave overnight. Cut into squares and leave unwrapped for a day, to dry and stiffen.

Marshmallow Fudge

  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • ¼ pint evaporated milk
  • ¼ pint fresh milk
  • 1oz butter
  • A pinch of cream of tartar
  • 8ozs marshmallows
  • 2ozs chopped nuts

Put the sugar, milks, butter and cream of tartar into a strong pan. Dissolve slowly and boil to 240°F, stirring all the time with a wooden spoon. Remove pan from heat and add the cut-up marshmallows and nuts. Beat till mixture is thick, then pour it into a greased tin and cut into square when cold.

Tutti Frutti Fudge

  • 4ozs golden syrup
  • 1oz margarine
  • 5 tablespoonfuls condensed milk
  • 2 tablespoonfuls water
  • 1oz chocolate
  • 6ozs sugar
  • 2-3 drops of vanilla essence
  • 6ozs chopped prunes and dates

Place syrup, margarine, milk, water and chocolate in a pan, heat to boiling point and boil for 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat, add sugar and dissolve slowly. As soon as sugar dissolves, bring the mixture to the boil rapidly and continue to boil without stirring to a temperature of 240°F. Remove from heat and add essence and fruit. Beat until creamy, and turn mixture at once into greased tin. Cut up when cold.

Vanilla Fudge

  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • 2ozs margarine
  • ¼ pint evaporated milk
  • ¼ pint water
  • A few drops of vanilla essence

Put all the ingredients except the essence, into a large pan, heat gently until the sugar has dissolved and the fat melted, and then bring to the boil. Boil steadily, stirring all the time until a temperature of 240°F is reached. Remove the pan from the heat and add the essence, then beat well. Continue beating the mixture until it becomes thick and creamy, as the sugar “grains”, then pour it into a greased tin about 6x8 inches and leave to cool. When it is nearly set, mark it into squares with a sharp knife, using a sawing motion.

Caramels

The chief difference between the methods of making caramel and fudge is that for caramels the syrup is not “grained” by continual stirring and beating, and it is boiled up to 250-260°F; the lower temperature is used for soft caramels, while the higher gives a harder texture.

Put caramel mixtures into a large pan, as they may boil up considerably and come over the top. The general rules for sugar-boiling are followed, but as various rich ingredients are used, it is usually necessary to give the mixture an occasional stir during the cooking, to prevent it catching on the bottom of the pan. (It is helpful to place the pan on an asbestos mat).
As soon as the caramel is cooked, pour it quickly into an oiled tin. The scrapings should not be included as they make the sweets sugary. When the caramel is nearly set, mark into squares; break it up when cold and wrap it in waxed or transparent paper. Store caramels in an airtight tin.

Plain Caramels

  • 8ozs sugar
  • 8ozs golden syrup
  • ¼ pint evaporated milk
  • ½ teaspoonful vanilla or other flavouring essence

Put the sugar, syrup and milk in a strong pan and heat gently until the sugar is dissolved. Bring it to the boil and continue until it forms a hard ball when tested in cold water (255°F) stir in the essence and pour mixture into a greased tin. Finish as described above.

Chocolate Caramels

  • 3 tablespoonfuls margarine
  • ¼ pint sweetened condensed milk
  • 8ozs sugar
  • 8 tablespoonfuls treacle
  • 2ozs cocoa
  • ½ teaspoonful vanilla essence

Melt the margarine and add the condensed milk, sugar and treacle. Bring to boiling point, add the cocoa and boil to 255°F. Add the essence, pour the mixture into a greased tin and finish in the usual way.

Walnut Caramels

  • ¼ pint milk
  • 1lb loaf sugar (Substitute granulated sugar)
  • 2ozs golden syrup
  • 1oz butter
  • 2ozs chopped walnuts
  • 1 teaspoonful vanilla essence

Heat the milk, sugar, syrup and butter slowly, stirring occasionally, until the sugar is dissolved. Boil to 255°F, then stir in the warmed nuts and the essence. Stir with a wooden spoon until thick, and pour into an oiled tin. Cut into squares when nearly cold.

Cream Vanilla Caramels

  • ¼ pint water
  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • 1oz margarine
  • 1 heaped tablespoonful condensed milk
  • 1 heaped tablespoonful glucose
  • ½ teaspoonful vanilla essence

Put the ingredients, except the glucose and essence, into a large pan and dissolve the sugar. Bring to the boil, add the glucose and boil to 250°F. Remove the pan from the heat, add the essence and pour the mixture into a greased tin. Finish as usual.

Toffees

Picture of hand made toffees

For these hard-textured sweets the sugar syrup is boiled to a higher temperature (270-310°F). the toffee may be flavoured in various ways.

Well-made toffee should have a perfectly clear appearance, so glucose or cream of tartar is added to prevent the mixture from becoming sugary and opaque. As with fudges and caramels, a large, thick pan should be used, to prevent the toffee from boiling over or catching. It is often helpful to brush the inside and top edge of the pan with sweet oil. Do not stir toffees, as this may crystallize the mixture, but change position of the pan on the heat frequently, and move the thermometer occasionally to a different place in the mixture, otherwise it may burn at that spot. Rich mixtures, such as Everton Toffee, need to be stirred to prevent them from catching.
Remove the pan from the direct heat when the temperature is about 5°, below the figure required, because the pan holds the heat and the mixture may over-boil; make sure, however, that the toffee does not actually come to the correct temperature.

Everton Toffee

  • 1lb sugar
  • ¼ pint milk
  • A pinch of cream of tartar
  • 4 tablespoonfuls fresh cream or evaporated milk
  • 2ozs butter
  • A pinch of salt
  • Flavourings, e.g., lemon essence

Prepare a greased tin to hold the hot toffee. Put the sugar and milk into a thick pan and heat gently to dissolve the sugar. Bring to the boil, add the cream of tartar and heat to 250°F. Slowly add the cream or evaporated milk, stirring all the time, and boil to 270°F. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the melted butter, salt and flavouring, then boil to 280-285°F. Pour the mixture into the prepared tin and leave it to set. Mark into squares when half-set, break it up when cold, and wrap in waxed paper.

Nut Toffee

  • 1lb Demerara sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • 1oz butter
  • 2-3 drops of acetic acid or 1 teaspoonful vinegar (white)
  • 2 small tablespoonfuls golden syrup
  • 3ozs chopped almonds or walnuts

Put the sugar and water into a thick pan and heat gently to dissolve the sugar. Bring to the boil and add the butter, cream of tartar, acetic acid and golden syrup. Cover, and boil again for a few minutes. Remove the lid and heat to 300°F, pour the mixture into a greased tin, sprinkle with the chopped nuts, and turn “sides to middle”. Finish as above.

Honeycomb Toffee

  • 8ozs sugar
  • A small pinch of cream of tartar
  • 1 tablespoonful golden syrup
  • ⅛ pint cold water
  • ¼ teaspoonful bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoonful warm water

Put the sugar, cream of tartar, syrup and cold water into a strong pan, and heat gently until the sugar has dissolved. Boil without stirring until the mixture reaches 310°F, then remove the pan from the heat. Mix the bicarbonate of soda with the warm water and add to the boiling toffee. Stir gently and pour at one into a greased tin. Finish in the usual way.

Treacle Toffee 1

  • 1½lbs brown sugar
  • 8ozs butter
  • 1lb treacle
  • ½ pint water
  • A pinch of cream of tartar

Put all the ingredients except the cream of tartar into a pan, cover and bring to the boil rapidly. Then add the cream of tartar, dissolved in a little cold water. Continue boiling for a few more minutes, remove the lid, wash down the sides of the pan with a brush dipped in cold water, then boil to 260°F, or until a drop of the mixture forms a hard ball in cold water. Pour into oiled tins to cool, mark with a knife and break into squares when cold.

Treacle Toffee 2

  • 1lb brown sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • A pinch of cream of tartar
  • 3ozs butter or margarine
  • 4ozs black treacle
  • 4ozs golden syrup

Dissolve the sugar in the water, and add the cream of tartar, butter, treacle and syrup. Bring to the boil and heat to 270°F, then pour the mixture into an oiled tin. Finish in the usual way.

Spanish Toffee

  • 3ozs hazelnuts
  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • 1oz margarine
  • 1 dessertspoonful vinegar (white)
  • ¼ pint water
  • A pinch of salt
  • 1 teaspoonful vanilla essence

Chop the nuts roughly and keep them warm. Put all the ingredients, except the essence, into a pan, and stir until dissolved. Boil the mixture to 300°F, or until the toffee will break off crisply when tested in cold water. Add the essence and pour half the toffee into a greased tin; sprinkle the hot nuts over the surface, then pour the remainder of the toffee over them. Finish in the usual way.

Butterscotch

  • 1lb Demerara sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • 2-3ozs fresh butter

Put the sugar and water into a pan, dissolve slowly and boil to 280°F, brushing down the sides of the pan with a brush dipped in cold water occasionally during the boiling. Add the butter a little at a time, and pour mixture into an oiled tin. Finish as usual.

Buttered Almonds and Walnuts

  • 1ozs almonds, slightly browned in the oven
  • 1ozs halved walnuts
  • 8ozs Demerara sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • A pinch of cream of tartar
  • 2ozs butter

Warm the nuts and space them out on an oiled slab, or put them into a very small-sized patty tins. Dissolved the sugar in the water, then bring to the boil and add the cream of tartar and the butter. Boil the syrup to 280°F, and then, using a teaspoon, pour a little toffee over each nut – it should set rapidly.

Toffee Apples

  • 6-8 ripe apples
  • 12ozs sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • A pinch of cream of tartar
  • 2ozs margarine
  • 1 teaspoonful vinegar
  • ¼ pint evaporated milk
  • Desiccated coconut (optional)

Wash and wipe the apples well. Put the sugar and water into a pan and dissolve over gentle heat. Add the cream of tartar, margarine, vinegar and evaporated milk, and boil to 290°F. Fix some wooden skewers in the apples and dip them, one at a time, into the toffee. (If the toffee will not stick to the apples, roughen the skins, by grating them slightly). Place the apples on a well-greased plate and leave to set. If desired, the apples may be sprinkled with desiccated coconut when the toffee is half-set.

Fondants

To make these soft, creamy sweets, a solution of sugar and water is boiled to 240°F. Fondant often forms the basis of other sweets, and can also be used for chocolate centers.

Basic Recipe

  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • 1oz glucose or a good pinch of cream of tartar

Put the sugar and water into a pan, carefully dissolve the sugar, bring to the boil, add the glucose or cream of tartar and boil to 240°F. Damp a suitable marble, enamel or plastic surface, pour the syrup on to it and leave it for a few minutes to cool.
Start folding in the edges of the syrup with a palette knife, collecting the mixture together, then continue working it, using a figure of eight movement, and the mixture will become opaque and slightly granular in appearance.
Continue working the mixture until it is cool and stiff enough to handle, and ready for kneading. If suitable flat surface is not available, pour the liquid fondant into a bowl and let it cool for a few minutes, then “turn” it with a palette knife until it is thick. It can be then kneaded on a sheet of greaseproof paper laid on a pastry board or table. (Any fondant that is not required for immediate use may be stored in a covered jar.)
Knead the fondant well until it is of an even, malleable texture throughout. (If you are using fondant that has been stored for some time, it will take a good deal of kneading.) The texture can be improved by adding a little evaporated milk or melted butter at this stage; if using fondant that was made earlier, add the milk or butter to the melted fondant. The richer mixture is especially suitable for coating with chocolate. Now divide the mixture into portions, and colour and flavour them appropriately.
Dredge a suitable surface with a little icing sugar and roll out the fondant about ¼ inch thick. Cut it into fancy shapes, using a small biscuit cutter, etc. place the sweets on a piece of waxed paper and leave in the air for a little while to dry, then put them in paper sweet cases.
If you possess one of the rubber fondant mats you can make fancy moulded creams. Dust the mat with a little cornflour. Melt the fondant in a basin over boiling water, colour and flavour it as required and heat it to approximately 180°F. Remove from heat and using a teaspoon, stir until it thickens, then leave to set – a few minutes only. When the creams are firm, bend the mat slightly backwards to remove them. A starch tray and moulds may also be used.

Picture of hand made fondant sweets

Chocolate Whirls

  • 8ozs fondant
  • 1oz chocolate

Knead the fondant until it is smooth and soft, then divide it into two portions. Melt the chocolate over hot water and mix it with haft the fondant, then roll this out into a thin strip and trim the edges. Roll out the white fondant into a strip of the same length and width, and place it on top of the chocolate one. Roll up from one edge, like a Swiss roll, pressing it into a sausage shape. Cut into slices ¼ inch thick.

Coconut Ice

  • 1lb granulated sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • 4ozs grated or desiccated coconut

Dissolve sugar in water and boil to a syrup, heating until it reaches a temperature of 240°F. Remove the pan from the heat and add the coconut. Stir until the mixture thickens, then quickly pour half into a greased tin; colour remained pink, pour it on top of the white “ice” and leave to set. When cool, cut into bars.

Cherry Bon-bons

  • Fondant
  • Maraschino flavouring
  • Pink colouring
  • A little water
  • Whole glace cherries

Put the fondant into a basin and melt it over boiling water; colour and flavour it and thin it down slightly with a few drops of water, until it will coat a wooden spoon easily but not too thickly. Using a skewer, dip the cherries in to the liquid fondant and put them on greaseproof paper to set. (They should set firmly within a few minutes.) The dipping should be carried out quickly, otherwise the fondant will be over heated and will go dull, while if it is removed from the heat, it will quickly set; it is therefore best to work with only small quanties at a time.
Other fruits and nuts can be coated in the same way, and make very attractive sweets if the fondant is appropriately coloured and flavoured.

Coconut Peppermint Creams

  • ½ egg white
  • ½lb icing sugar
  • A few drops of peppermint essence
  • A few drops of green colouring
  • Desiccated coconut

Sieve the icing sugar. Put the half egg white into a bowl and gradually mix in the icing sugar. The mixture should be stiff enough to roll between the hands and keep its shape. Add the peppermint essence to flavour and a little green colouring. Shape small oblongs of the mixture, then coat with desiccated coconut. Put the sweets into paper cases.

Peppermint Creams

  • Fondant
  • Peppermint essence or oil of peppermint

Knead the fondant very well to soften it, and add peppermint essence or oil to taste. (The latter is considerably stronger, so should be used with care.) Roll out about ¼ inch thick and cut into rounds about 1 inch in diameter; put them on waxed paper and leave to dry in the air.

Walnut Creams

  • Fondant
  • Coffee essence
  • Halved walnuts

Knead the fondant, then add a few drops of coffee essence, kneading it into the mixture. Shape into balls about 1 inch in diameter. Press a half walnut into each ball and put the sweets into paper cases.

"Pulled" Sweets

If toffee and similar boiled sugar mixtures are “pulled” while still warm and pliable, they acquire a satiny, silvery appearance, and a wide variety of attractively striped sweets can be made by combining pulled and unpulled toffee.

Toffee Humbugs

  • 1lb brown sugar
  • 2ozs butter or margarine
  • ¼ pint water
  • 1 tin golden syrup
  • ¼ teaspoonful cream of tartar
  • Vanilla, almond, ginger, cinnamon or clove essence

Put the ingredients except cream of tartar and essence in a large pan, and bring to the boil. Add the cream of tartar and boil to 290°F. Add the flavouring, and pour the mixture onto an oiled heat-resisting surface such as enamel or marble.
Leave the toffee until a skin has formed, then, using two flexible oiled knives, turn in the edges and scrape the toffee off the slab, continuing until it is cool and firm enough to handle.
Oil the hands, form the toffee into a sausage shape and pull it, then fold in the ends, twist and pull again. Another method is to throw the toffee rope over a hook screwed into a wall, let it drop, then collect up the ends, fold them up, and again loop the toffee over the hook.
Repeat the pulling and folding until the toffee has a good sheen and is beginning to harden. It is essential to work very quickly, before the toffee sets, and a beginner may find it advisable to have an assistant. If all the toffee cannot be pulled at once, leave it on an oiled tin in a warm place, to keep it soft.
Quickly shape the toffee into a rope about ¾ inch in diameter, and with oiled scissors cut off pieces ¾ inch long, half twisting the toffee rope each time to give the correct humbug shape.
Wrap each toffee in a piece of waxed or transparent paper, to prevent it from becoming sticky, and store in an airtight tin.

Peppermint Humbugs

  • 2lb Demerara sugar
  • 3ozs margarine
  • ½ pint water
  • 2 tablespoonfuls golden syrup
  • ¼ teaspoonful cream of tartar
  • Oil of peppermint

Put all the ingredients except the oil of peppermint into a large pan. When the sugar is completely dissolved, bring the mixture to a temperature of 290°F. Pour it out onto a suitable greased surface and allow it to cool a little. Using a greased palette knife, fold the side of the toffee into the center, and add a few drops of oil of peppermint. When the mixture is cool enough to handle, cut off one third of it and pull this until it is a pale colour but still soft. Meanwhile an assistant should gently form the remaining toffee into four ropes and press these against the sides of the thick roll; pull out evenly and gently to the required thickness, and cut into humbugs, using oiled scissors. For large humbugs, leave the toffee in a thicker roll, then cut as above.
When the sweets are cold, wrap them in transparent paper and store them in an airtight tin.

Walnut Molasses

  • 1lb Demerara sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • A pinch of cream of tartar
  • 1oz butter
  • 3ozs chopped toasted walnuts

Dissolve the sugar in the water and bring to the boil; add the cream of tartar and continue boiling to a temperature of 270°F. Add the butter in small pieces and boil to 280°F. Pour the mixture onto a suitable oiled surface and sprinkle with the prepared walnuts. Fold from the sides to the center until the mixture is cool enough to handle, then oil the fingers and pull the toffee out until it is the thickness of a walking stick. Quickly cut it into pieces with oiled scissors, and when cold wrap in waxed paper.

Barley Sugar 1

  • 1lb loaf sugar or granulated sugar
  • ¼ pint water
  • A pinch of cream of tartar
  • Rind and juice of ½ a lemon

Put the sugar and water into a pan, and when sugar has dissolved, add cream of tartar and strips of lemon rind. Boil to 240°F, remove from heat, and add lemon juice. Boil to 310°F, remove rind and pour mixture on to a slightly oiled slab. Cool it slightly, then fold sides to middle. Cit it into strips with oiled scissors and twist each strip. Store in airtight jars.

Barley Sugar 2

Replace ½lb of the loaf sugar in the above recipe by ½lb glucose, and use a few drops of lemon essence instead of lemon juice. Put the sugar and water in a pan, dissolve slowly and add the glucose and lemon rind. Boil to 312°F. remove rind, add essence and pour mixture on to an oiled slab. When slightly cooled, fold sides into middle. Rub fingers with oil and pull mixture. Quickly divide with oiled knife, pull and twist.