Preserves, Jams, Jellies & Condiments



Jams and Preserves

Mincemeat

1/4 lb candid peel
2 lbs apples
1 lb currants
1 lb sultanas
1 lb sugar
½ lb suet
The grated rind and juice of 1 lemon
½ grated nutmeg

Wash and pick the currants. Stone the raisins, chop the suit and apples. Mix well together and press into jam pots and seal.


Quantities of water and sugar for use in jams
Fruit Quantity Water
Apricots (stoned) 1 lb 1 gill
Black Currants 1 lb ½ gill
Cherries 1 lb 1 gill
Damsons (stoned) 1 lb None
Gooseberries 1 lb 1 gill
Loganberries 1 lb None
Plums (stoned) ¾ to 1 lb None
Raspberries ¾ to 1 lb None
Red Currants 1 lb None
Rhubarb 1 lb None
Strawberries ¾ to 1 lb None

For reference; - 4 Gills, equals one pint and one pound equals 454 grams.

SOME ESSENTIALS FOR GOOD JAM

  • 1. The fruit must be perfectly fresh and never over-ripe, never use bruised fruit or the jam will fail to keep
  • 2. Use a good-sized pan; allowing plenty of space for the jam to boil without the risk of it boiling over, a strong aluminium pan is best
  • 3. The all the sugar must be dissolved before the contents of the pan come to the boil. If this is not done the jam is liable to be sugary, granulated, lump, or preserving sugar may be used
  • 4. If whole-fruit jam is being made, a syrup must be made first and the fruit added afterwards
  • 5. Remember to skim the jam when it comes to the boil, and keep it skimmed throughout the boiling period as required, this ensures that the jam being clear when cold
  • 6. Stir the jam occasionally to prevent sticking to the pan
  • 7. Always test the jam before taking it off the stove by putting a small quantity on a saucer and leaving it to go cold, it should form a jelly. During this period turn out the gas so that the jam does not continue to boil. If it does not set stiff enough, light the gas again, and boil the jam a little longer
  • 8. Ensure the storage pots are perfectly dry and clean before use
  • 9. The jam may be potted either hot or warm. If poured when hot, then the jars must be pre heated to ensure they do not crack, once poured cover immediately and make airtight. The best method to warm the jars is to put them in a cool oven and warm them gradually. If it decided bottled the jam when cool, allow the jam to go cold and make sure an airtight seal is achieved
  • 10. Store jam in a cool, dry place, labelling with the type and date

SEALING THE POTS

Particular care must be given to the sealing of the pots, if they are not airtight, the jam will deteriorate.
Parchment or adhesive covers can be used. The latter are not quite as good as parchment, for when the jam is ready to be used the adhesive seal has to be broken, whereas the string may be untied from the parchment covers and re-tied after use.
Choose thick parchment covers, immerse them in cold water, dry them lightly on a tea cloth. Place them when damp on the jars and tie them securely. When dry they should be quite taut and ensure an airtight seal.
Some fruits combine well in making mixed fruits. For instance – raspberries and cherries; gooseberries and strawberries; rhubarb and strawberries and red currants and raspberries.
Rhubarb jam is improved by the additional flavouring of lemon-rind and juice, also a little ginger. If using lump ginger, bruise it and tie it in muslin, and add it with the sugar; if preserved ginger, cut it up and mix it into the jam when it has nearly finished boiling.
Half an ounce of lump ginger and the rind of half a lemon are sufficient for one pound of rhubarb, which should, like all other fruit, be weighed after being prepared.

APPLE JAM

4 lb. Of apples (peeled and cored)
Rind and juice of 1 lemon
One and a half oz. of lump sugar
Few cloves
1. Pint of water
Ginger

Three quarters pound of sugar should be used to every pint of pulp. Wipe the apples, peel them thinly and cut into quarters then take out the cores. Cut the lemon-rind thinly and tie in a bag with a few cloves. Bruise the ginger and tie in muslin. Put the apples into a pan with the water and flavourings, and cook gently until soft. Take out the ginger and the clove-bag. Rub the apples through a sieve. Measure the pulp and allow the sugar in proportion as above. Return to the pan with the flavouring bags; add the lemon juice and sugar, cook slowly until the sugar is dissolved, then boil until it will form a jelly when cold. Take out the bags before potting the jam. Remember to use good flavoured cooking apples. If for personal preference, the jam may be coloured pink with a few drops of cochineal, this should be added when the jam is boiling.

APRICOT JAM

3 lb. Fresh Apricots
3 lb. Granulated sugar
Half pint of water

Wash the fruit, cut in half and remove stones. Put into a large pan with ½ pint cold water. Simmer until fruit is tender. Remove pan from heat, add sugar. Return to heat and bring to boil, boil rapidly for 20 to 30 minutes. Test for set. When setting point is reached take pan immediately from heat, skim surface. Leave a little to cool. Fill jars and seal, this makes 5 lb of jam. Note: The stones can be cracked, and the kernels blanched and added to the jam just before it has finished boiling.

BLACKBERRY JAM

4 lb. Blackberries
4 lb. Sugar
8 Tablespoons water
Juice of 1 lemon

Put the blackberries into a preserving pan with the water and cook them on a low heat until they are soft and juicy. Warm the sugar in a low oven, stir into the blackberries. Add the lemon juice and stir on a low heat until sugar is dissolved. The raise the heat and boil until setting point this is about 15 minutes. Pour into hot jars, cover and seal when cold.

BLACKBERRY AND APPLE JAM

4 lb. Blackberries
2 lb. Apples (after peeling and cored)
Four and a half pounds of lump sugar
1. Pint of water

Remove stalks. Put the sugar and water into a preserving pan, and let it slowly dissolve. Wipe the apples, peel, cut into quarters, remove core and cut into slices. Place the apples and blackberries into the pan with the dissolved sugar and water. Bring to the boil, and boil for about one hour, skim the surface. Then pour into pre heated jam jars and seal.

BLACKBERRY AND ELDERBERRY JAM

Three and a half pounds pound of elderberries
Three and a half pounds of demerara sugar
Three and a half pounds of blackberries
Three quarters of a pint of water

Cook elderberries gently in water for 10 minutes. Add blackberries for a further 10 minutes. Heat sugar in oven, then add to fruit. Bring to boil. After 5 minutes of hard-boiling, start testing for setting, by placing a little jam on a chilled plate. If a skin forms wrinkles when pushed with finger, jam is ready. To keep well, it is best potted immediately into hot jars, sealed airtight with metal of plastic covers. This is a low sugar jam.

CHERRY AND BLACK CURRANT JAM

1 lb. Black cherries (stoned)
2 lb. Black currants
2. Pints water
1 oz. butter
4 lb. Preserving sugar

Strip the black currants from their stems by running a fork along them. Wash the black currants and cherries then place in a preserving pan, add the water cover and simmer fruit for 30 minutes, until tender. Add the sugar and stir the mixture until sugar is dissolved. Bring the jam to a boil, then boil it steadily for about 25 - 30 minutes until the setting point is reached.
To test if the jam has set, remove from heat, spoon a little jam onto a small plate and leave to one side to cool. Then using a finger, push the surface, if the jam wrinkles it has reached setting point, if not, boil it a little longer. Stir in the butter – this helps to reduce the scum.
Leave the jam for about 10 minutes. So that the fruit is evenly dispersed, remove any remaining scum and pour into warmed jars, fill to the neck. Cover each jar with a round of waxed paper, then stretch a transparent cover over and secure. Makes 7 lb.

CHERRY AND APRICOT JAM

2 lb. Cherries (stoned)
2 lb. Apricots (stoned)
4 lb. Sugar
Three quarters pint of water

Remove stalks and pick over the fruit. Stone the cherries, also stone and quarter the apricots, then weigh them. Place the prepared fruits into a preserving pan, sprinkle each layer with sugar, and leave for about 12 hours, after which time add the water. Stand the pan over a low burner, and when the sugar is dissolved, boil the jam, keeping it skimmed and stirred, as required. The stones from the apricots can be cracked, the kernels blanched and added to the jam when boiling. Boil the liquid until it will form a jelly when cold. Sufficient to make about 6 lb of jam.

DAMSON JAM

1 lb. Damsons
1 lb. Sugar

Remove stalks and wipe the damsons. Put the fruit into a preserving pan with the sugar. Heat slowly until the sugar dissolves, then bring to the boil and then boil for one hour. Remove the stones as they are freed from the fruit.

GOOSEBERRY AND LIME JAM

4 lb. Preserving or granulated sugar
2 lb. Gooseberries
Two and a half pints of water
1 oz. Butter
2. Limes

Top and tail the gooseberries using a pair of scissors, and wash them thoroughly. Coarsly mince the limes or chop them finely and removed the pips. Put the pips into a muslin bag and fasten to side of pan. Put the limes into the pan with the gooseberries and add water, then bring mixture slowly to the boil and simmer it gently.
Using a wooden spoon, crush the gooseberries against the side of the pan as the mixture is simmering to extract as much of the juice as possible. Cook the fruit for about 15 to 20 minutes until tender.
Remove the bag of pips and squeeze out all the liquid that has been absorbed. Stir in the sugar and when totally dissolved, bring the jam to the boil and continue to boil for about 20 to 25 minutes until the setting point is reached. Test the jam and leave for about 10 minutes, then pour into warmed jars and seal. Makes 6 lb.

LOGANBERRY JAM

4 lb. Loganberries
4 lb. Granulated sugar

Remove stalks from fruit and wash well. Put fruit in a preserving pan or large heavy-based saucepan. Do not add any water. Heat fruit very gently until juice from the fruit is extracted and runs freely.
Add the sugar and stir well until it is dissolved. Boil fairly rapidly for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, then. test for set. If setting point is not yet reached, return to boil and test again after 2-3 minutes. When setting point is reached skim surface with a metal spoon. Allow jam to cool a little and fill pre warmed jars. Cover with waxed circles and seal. Makes 6 lb.

MIXED FRUIT JAM

1 lb. Cherries (when stoned)
1 lb. Gooseberries
1 lb. Black currants
1 lb. Strawberries
1 lb. Red currants
1 lb. Raspberries
5 lb. Sugar
2 Gills water

Prepare all the fruits, and then place in a preserving pan with the water and sugar. Cook slowly until the sugar is dissolved, then bring to the boil; then boil until it will form a jelly when cold. Skim and remove any scum during the boiling phase and stir as required to ensure the jam does not stick to the pan. Should make about 9 lb. of jam.

PEAR AND APPLE JAM

Three and a half pounds of dessert pears
Three and a half pounds of dessert apples
5 lb. Preserving sugar
2. Lemons -grated rind and juice
4 oz. Candied peel, chopped

Put the lemon rind and candied peel into a large saucepan. Peel and core the apples and pears. Cut the flesh into small pieces and add to the lemon rind with the lemon juice. Cook the fruit very gently for 20 minutes with a lid on the pan. Then cover the pan with a clean cloth and leave overnight.
Next, add sugar, heat gently until the sugar is dissolved. Boil rapidly until a set is obtained. Skin any froth off the surface of jam, using a metal spoon. Leave jam to cool a little, then fill pre warmed jars. Cover and seal.
Makes 6 lb.

PLUM JAM

1 lb. Plums
Three quarters pound of sugar

Remove stalk and wipe the plums. Put fruit and sugar into a preserving pan and cook slowly until the sugar is dissolved. The heat must be very gentle at first, so that the sugar melts and the juice comes out of the plums and the mixture does not burn. Bring to the boil, and boil for three-quarters to one hour. While the jam is boiling most of the stones will boil out of the plums. These can be cracked, and the kernels blanched and put back into the jam.

QUINCE JAM or JAPONICA

2 lb. Quinces
3 lb. Sugar
2. Lemons (or 1 squeezy lemon)
3. Pints water

Wash fruit well, but do not peel or cut. Place in a pan with water and simmer until soft enough to pierce the quinces easily with a knitting needle. Lift fruit out, one at a time, and with a knife and fork remove the core. Place pulp back in juice; add sugar and strained juice of lemons and boil rapidly for three-quarters of an hour. Pour into hot jars and cover while hot.

RASPBERRY AND MINT JAM

4 lb. Raspberries
4 lb. Granulated sugar
6. Large sprigs of mint

Remove stalks from fruit, wash raspberries and mint well. Beat mint with a rolling pin to bruise it. Tie in clean muslin. Put raspberries into a preserving pan, do not add any water. Heat fruit very gently until the juice runs freely. Add the mint in muslin bag together with sugar and stir until dissolved. Boil fairly rapidly for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Test for set. When setting point is reached, remove the mint and skim surface. Allow jam to cool a little then fill pre heated jars and seal. Makes 6 lb.

RED CURRANT JAM

2 lb. Red currants
3 lb. Granulated sugar

Remove stalks and wash fruit. Place the fruit into a preserving pan with one and a quarter pints of cold water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the fruit is tender, stirring all the time. Remove from heat and add sugar. Return, and cook gently, stirring until the sugar is dissolved, then boil for about 15 minutes. Test for set, when the setting point is reached, skim surface with metal spoon, allow to cool slightly, then fill the pre heated jars and seal. Makes around 5 lb.

RHUBARB AND ROSE PETAL JAM

1 lb. Rhubarb
1 lb. Granulated sugar
Juice of a lemon
2 Large handfuls of red rose petals
Half a pint of water
Small knob of butter

Wipe the rhubarb, trim off the base and the leaves and cut the sticks into 1-inch lengths. Put the rhubarb pieces into a bowl and mix in the sugar, water and lemon juice. Cover the bowl and leave in a cool place to stand overnight so that the sugar starts to dissolve.
Next day, pour the rhubarb mixture into a preserving pan. Wash the rose petals, then chop roughly and add them to the rhubarb. Stir the mixture over a gentle heat until sugar is dissolved, then bring the jam to the boil and boil rapidly for 5 to 7 minutes until setting point is reached. Test, and stir in the butter. Leave the jam to stand for about 10 minutes before pouring into warmed jars, then seal. Makes 2 lb.

ROSE PETAL JAM 1

1 lb. Rose petals
6 oz. Demerara sugar
6 oz. Honey

Collect petals for several days, keeping cool and covered in a large jar, until the required weight is acquired. Heat sugar in oven, add to petals with the honey and a very little water, boil and start testing for setting by placing a small amount on a cold plate after five minutes. Pot while hot and seal with airtight tops.

ROSE PETAL JAM 2

Half a pound of rose petals
½ lb honey
Juice of 1 lemon
Half a pint of water

There should be no dew on the petals. Wash 2 x 1 lb. jars. Put into a very low oven to warm. Put the rose petals, honey and a half pint of water into a pan and bring to boil. Simmer gently for about 10 minutes or until rose petals are soft. Strain, and return the liquid to the pan, then add lemon juice. Bring to the boil; then boil until setting point is reached, test in usual manner, leave for 2 minutes. Pour rose petals mixture into 2 x1lb. pre heated jars and stir well. Cover the jars with waxed paper rounds, then cellophane and seal.
Makes 2 jars.

STRAWBERRY JAM

1 lb. Strawberries
Three quarter pound of sugar

Clean the strawberries and pick them over, put into a preserving pan and start to cook slowly. When some of the juice has come out add sugar, and heat slowly until the sugar it is dissolved. Bring to the boil and boil for about one hour.

STRAWBERRY AND ORANGE JAM

4 lb. Strawberries
4 lb. Preserving or granulated sugar
3 oranges – juice and rind grated
1 oz. Butter

Select fresh and slightly under ripe strawberries, remove the stalks and put the fruit into a preserving pan, then pour in the orange juice and add the rind. Put any pips into a small piece of muslin and tie into a bag. Then fasten the bag to the side of the pan so that it sits in the jam. Put the pan over a low heat cover and gently simmer the fruit, for about 15 minutes until the strawberries are really soft, this can be tested by pressing them against the side of the pan to extract the juice. Remove the bag of pips and squeeze out any juice. Add the sugar and stir the mixture until all is dissolved, then bring the jam to the boil; then boil rapidly for about 10 minutes until the setting point is reached. Test, stir in the butter to remove the scum.
Leave the jam to stand for about 10 minutes so that the fruit is evenly dispersed, then pour into warmed jars and seal. Makes 6 lb.

DATE JAM

Half a pound stoned dates
2 oz. Chopped nuts
Half a pint of water
1 lemon.

Chop the dates and cook in water for about 20 minutes. Then add the grated lemon rind and juice together with the chopped nuts, mix well, and store in heated jars.
Note, The jam does not keep long.

Jellies

APPLE AND BLACKBERRY JELLY

4 lb. Blackberries
3 lb. Cooking apples
Juice of 2 lemons

Wash the blackberries and apples, roughly chop the apples – do not peel.
Put the blackberries, apples and lemon juice together with 2 pints of cold water in a preserving pan. Bring to the boil and simmer gently until the apples are soft and pulpy.
Strain overnight through a scalded jelly bag or several layers of clean muslin [See Apple & Orange Jelly].
Measure the strained juice and return it to a clean pan, add 1 lb. sugar to every pint of juice.
Bring to the boil, stirring all the time until sugar dissolves, then boil rapidly until a set is obtained. Skim surface of jelly using a metal spoon. Pour jelly straight away into pre-warmed jars, cover and seal; this should make 6 lb.

APPLE AND ORANGE JELLY

3 lb. Cooking Apples
One and a half pounds of oranges
1 Lemon

Wash the apples, oranges and lemon. Cut the apples and oranges into small pieces and put into a large preserving pan. Squeeze the lemon; add the juice and skin to the pan. Cover with water and simmer gently until the fruit is soft and pulpy.
If you have a jelly bag, scald it, by boiling it in a pan, then remove and allow to cool and wring out. Otherwise use four thicknesses of clean muslin. Tie to a jelly stand, or the legs of an upturned stool, or even a plate rack of a cooker. Put a large bowl underneath, then pour the fruit and liquid into the bag or muslin, and strain through into bowl, it is best to leave it overnight. On no account squeeze the bag or the jelly will be cloudy.
Measure the juice and return to a cleaned pan, adding 1 lb. sugar for every pint of juice. Bring to the boil stirring until the sugar dissolves, then boil rapidly until a set is obtained. Skim surface of jelly. Pour jelly straight away into pre warmed jars, cover and seal.
Makes 4.5 lb.

APRICOT AND GRAPE JELLY

2 lb. Apricots, halved and stoned
1 lb Black grapes, washed
2 Lemons

Chop the apricots and lemons roughly, and put into a preserving pan with the grapes. Almost cover the fruit with water and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, cover the pan and simmer for about 20 mins. or until tender. As the fruit is cooking, crush it against the side of the pan to extract as much of the juice as possible.
Sterilize or pour some boiling water through a jelly bag, then suspend the bag over a bowl and pour the fruit mixture into the bag. Leave to drip for at least 4 hours or overnight – avoid squeezing the bag as this could make the jelly cloudy.
When all the juice has retrieved, measure the juice and place in a preserving pan adding one pound of sugar for every pint of juice. Place on a low heat until all the sugar is dissolved, stirring occasionally. When the sugar is fully dissolved, bring the liquid to the boil and boil rapidly for about 30 to 35 mins. or until a setting point is reached. Test, if OK. pour into pre-heated jars and seal.
Makes 4 lb

BRAMBLE JELLY

4. lb. Slightly under-ripe blackberries
Juice of two lemons
Three quarters pint of water
1. lb. Sugar per pint

Wash the blackberries and remove any stalks. Put into a large preserving pan with the lemon juice and quarter pint of cold water. Simmer gently for 1 hour or until the fruit is cooked and reduced. Spoon into a sterilized jelly bag and leave for 12 hours or overnight, then discard pulp, do not squeeze the jelly bag. Measure the juice and add 1 lb sugar to each pint of liquid, stirring all the time until the sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil, and boil rapidly for 10 mins. Test for set, leave jam to cool a little, then fill pre-warmed jars. Cover and seal.

CRAB APPLE JELLY

4 lb. Crab apples
Two and a half pint of water
A few whole cloves or little bruised root ginger or thinly pared orange or lemon rind

Wash the crab apples and cut into quarters. Put in a preserving pan with the water and add either the cloves, ginger or fruit rind. Bring to the boil and simmer for about one and a half hours or until the crab apples are very soft and pulpy. Mash the fruit and strain through a sterilized jelly bag or muslin cloth for up to 12 hours. Measure the juice and then pour into a clean pan, add 1 lb. sugar to each pint of liquid. Heat gently until the sugar has dissolved, stirring frequently, then bring to the boil and boil rapidly until setting point is reached (105C. -221F). Remove any scum from the surface with a spoon and pour into pre-warmed jars. Cover with waxed disks and with a dampened cellophane circle. Cool, label, and store in a cool, dark place.
Note; - Apple jelly is made in the same way as this recipe, but apples give a rather bland jelly, a few suggested flavourings are a few blackberries, blackcurrants or raspberries and would give it more flavour.
Japonica jelly is also made in the same way.

HAWTHORN JELLY

3 lb. Hawthorn Berries
One and a half pounds of cooking apples
3 Pints of water

Wash the hawthorn berries and remove the stems, chop the apples, without peeling and coring. Put the berries and apples into a preserving pan with the water. Bring gently to the boil and simmer until you have a thick pulp this takes about 1 hour. Turn the pulp into a sterilize jelly bag and leave it to drip for 12 hours.
Measure the liquid and return to clean pan, add 1 lb of light brown [Demerara] sugar for each pint of liquid, stir on a low heat until the sugar dissolved. Boil until setting point is reached and pour jelly into pre-warmed jars. Cover and seal.
Makes 1 ½ lb.

QUINCE and CRANBERRY JELLY

2 lb. Quince
2 x 12 oz. bags of cranberries
Three and three quarter pounds of sugar
1 Lemon
1 Bag of pectin and viola
Water

Use nearly ripe fruit (yellow, maybe with a tinge of green), better pectin levels in under ripe fruit. Wash, scrub the fuzz off, quarter and core the fruit. Cover the fruit with water till they just float. After they come to the boil, cook for about 15 mins, then added 2 bags of cranberries and bring back to boil. Add juice of lemon and cook for a further 30 mins. Suspend mash in a sterilised jelly bag until all juice is removed usually about 5 x 8 oz. cups).
Add the sugar and bag of pectin and viola.

QUINCE JELLY

Use ripe quince
1 Pint of water to be added for each pound of fruit.

Pare and cut up the quince and place them into water. Gently simmer, but not long enough to change colour to red. Strain through a sterilized jelly bag for 12 hours. Measure the juice and put into a preserving pan and boil quickly for 15 mins. Take from heat and stir in 12 oz sugar per pint of juice, then boil for another 15 to 20 mins stir to make sure the sugar is dissolved. Remove any scum before bottling. Test and bottle.
Apples can be added for a good combination and flavour.

ROSE HIP JELLY

2 lb. cooking apples
Cold water
1 lb. Sugar to every pint of liquid

Remove any damaged/bruised portions from apples, roughly chop. Put the fruit into a large saucepan with rosehips and enough water to cover. Bring them to the boil and simmer for 45 mins. until the fruit is soft and pulpy, stiring from time to time. Break down fruit with a wooden spoon then strain the contents through a sterilised jelly bag for 12 hours or overnight. Discard pulp, and measure the liquid then return to clean pan, gently warm the required amount of sugar in a warm oven. Stir the sugar into the liquid and place on a low heat until sugar is dissolved. Bring to the boil, boil rapidly for 15 mins. Test for set, and pour the jelly into pre heated jars, cover and seal.

ROSE PETAL JELLY

10 Large cooking apples
1 Pint of cold water
1 X 3 Inch Cinnamon stick
Thinly pared rind of half a lemon
1 oz. Fresh rose petals
8 oz. of sugar to every half pint of liquid

Peel, core and slice the apples. Put them into a large saucepan with water, cinnamon stick and lemon rind. Bring them to the boil and simmer for one and a half hours until they are soft and pulpy. Strain the contents through a sterilize jelly bag for 12 hours and measure the liquid. Return the liquid into a clean pan, add the correct amount of sugar which as previously been warmed in an oven. Stir the sugar into the liquid and place on a low heat until sugar is dissolved. Bring to the boil, stir in rose petals and continue stirring until setting point is reached. Pour the jelly into pre-heated jars. Cover and seal.

SLOE AND APPLE JELLY

2 lb. Sloes
2 lb. Cooking apples
2 Pints of water
1 lb. of light brown sugar per pint of liquid

Put the sloes into a large saucepan, chop the apples without peeling or coring and place the fruit into a saucepan, pour in the water. Set the pan on a low heat and bring gently to the boil. Simmer gently, stirring frequently, until the fruits are very soft this is about 45 mins.
Pour the fruit pulp into a sterilize jelly bag and let juice drip into a bowl, leave for 12 hours. Return the juice to a cleaned pan and bring to the boil, stir in right quantity of sugar ensuring it is completely dissolved, then boil until setting point is reached.
Take the pan off heat and skim the jelly. Put into pre warmed jars and cover with waxed circles. Cover completely when cold.
Makes 2 lb

SLOE JELLY

4 lb. Sloes
Water

Use sugar in the ratio of 1 pound per pint of juice.
Cover with hardly any water. Set the pan on a low heat and bring gently to the boil. Simmer for one and a half to two hours, until the fruits are very soft and pulpy stirring from time to time.
Pour the fruit pulp into a sterilized jelly bag and let juice drip into a bowl for 12 hours or overnight. Return the juice to a clean pan and add the sugar, stir until all the sugar is dissolved and then boil rapidly for 10 mins., test for set.
Take the pan off heat and skim the jelly. Pour into pre warmed jars and cover with waxed circles, cover completely when cold.

Apple Jelly

1 lb. of apples [weigh after peeling and coring]
1 pint of water
1 oz. gelatine
The rind and juice of a lemon

Put the apples in a saucepan and cook until they have fallen. Add the grated lemon rind, juice and sugar. Then add the gelatine, mix and pour into a wet mould and serve with custard or cream.

Apple Jelly 2

Do not through away any peel [after initial washing of the apples] or cores. Put them into a dish, cover with water and put in an oven while it is being for other cooking and cover with a lid. When all the goodness has been extracted, strain off the juice and discard the residue, clean the dish, and return the juice adding a little sugar [about three tablespoon to a teacup] and let simmer without the lid unit the jelly sets. Using this method makes a very nice jelly a little extra cost/fuel, adding cloves, ginger or lemon essence adds additional flavour.

PECTIN TEST

1 tsp juice cool, 1 tbsp methylated sprits, shake glass leave 1 min. mixture forms a jelly like clot.
If it does not form a single clot, pectin content is low and some form of extra pectin required.
Lemon Juice, 2 tbsp to 4 lb fruit with poor setting
Sometimes an acid only is added such as citric or tartaric acid.
Natural acid ½ level tsp to 4 lb of fruit with setting properties.
2 lb fruit
1 – 1 ½ pint water
stew gently for 45 mins until well pulped , strain via jelly bag.
Allow ¼ - ½ pint extract to 4 lb fruit.

GOOSEBERRY JAM

6 LB GOOSEBERRIES
7 LB 10 OZ GRANULATED SUGAR

Top, tail and wash gooseberries. Put into a large pan (If you use a copper pan your gooseberry jam will be a lovely green. In an ordinary pan it will turn pink). Add 1 ¾ + 4 tbsps cold water. Simmer for 30 mins or until fruit is tender. Remove from heat add sugar and stir well till dissolved. Return to heat, bring to boil and boil rapidly for 15 to 20 mins. Test for set.
When setting point is reached take pan off heat, skim surface, leave to cool a little.
Fill jars and seal.
Makes 12 lb.

PEACH AND RASPBERRY JAM

2LB PEACHES
2 LB RASPBERRIES
¼ PT WATER
3 LB PRESERVING OR GRANULATED SUGAR
KNOB OF BUTTER

To peel peaches; drop them into a pan of boiling water and count to 10. Remove them with a spoon – the skins should now be easily removed with a sharp knife. Halve the peaches and remove the stone. Using nut crackers or a rolling pin, carefully crack the stones and remove the kernels. Slice the peaches and put them into a preserving pan with the kernels. Hull the raspberries and add them to the pan with the water, then cover the pan. Cook the fruit mixture gently for about 15 to 20 mins. Until the fruit is tender. Add the sugar and stir until all os dissolved, then bring to a rolling boil and boil it rapidly for 15 to 20 mins until the setting point is reached. Test if the jam has set. Stir in the butter when the jam is ready.
Leave the jam for about 10 mins. So that the fruit is evenly dispersed, then pour into warmed jars and seal.
Makes 5 lb

FRUIT JELLY MAKING

The first stage in making a jelly is to pulp the fruit. Do this by packing the clean fruit into a saucepan or preserving pan and just covering with water. Bring to the boil and simmer until all the fruit is mushy. With harder skinned fruits (blackcurrants, haws, etc) you need to help the process along by pressing with a spoon, be prepared to simmer for up to 30 mins. This is the stage to supplement the pectin, if your fruit has poor setting properties. Add the juice of 1 lemon for every 2 lbs of fruit.

When you have the pulp, separate the juice from the roughage by straining through muslin (or jelly bag). This is most easily done by lining a large bowl with a good sized sheet of muslin, folded double, and filling the bowl with the fruit pulp. Then lift and tie the corners of the muslin, using the back of a chair of low cloths line as support, so that it hangs like a sock over the bowl.

To obtain the max volume of juice, allow the pulp to strain overnight. When you have all the juice, measure its volume and transfer to a clean pan with 1 lb of preserving sugar for every pint of juice. Bring to the boil, stirring well, and boil rapidly, skimming of scum. A jelly will normally form when the mixture has reached 221 deg.F on a jam thermometer or test by transfer one drop of mixture onto a cold saucer. If setting is imminent, the drop will not run after a few seconds as a skin forms across it.

As soon as the setting temp has been achieved, pour the mixture into warm jars, cover the surface with waxed disc. Then cover.

CRAB APPLE JELLY

Ingredients
5 ½ lb crab apples
3 pints water
few whole cloves or little bruised root ginger
1 lb Sugar to pint liquid

Cut apples into quarters. Put in with water and add the cloves, ginger Bring to the boil and simmer gently 1 ½ hours or until soft and pulpy. Stain through a jelly bag or muslin cloth for 12 hours or overnight. Measure the strained juice and put into a clean pan with 1lb sugar to each 1 pint. Heat gently until the sugar has dissolved, stirring frequently, then bring to the boil and boil rapidly for 10 mins. Test for set Remove any scum from the surface then pour into warmed jars. Cover with waxed disks and the with dampened cellophane circle.
Cool, label and store in a cool, dark place.

QUINCE JELLY

RIPE QUINCE
12 oz SUGAR to each lb (pint)
1 PINT WATER to each lb of fruit

Pare and slice the quince and cut them up.place into water. Gently simmer, but not long enough to change colour to red. Strain through a jelly bag. Weigh the juice next day and put into a preserving pan and boil quickly for 15 mins. Take from heat and stir in 12 oz sugar per lb of juice. Boil for another 15 – 20 mins. till cooked, stirring all the time, remove scum.
Test and bottle.
Apples can be added for a good combination.

QUINCE JELLY 1

3 LB QUINCE
WATER
1 ½ LB SUGAR
4 tbsp FRESH LEMON JUICE

Use nearly ripe fruit (yellow, maybe with a tinge of green) Better pectin levels in underripe fruit. Wash, scrub the fuzz off and quarter and core the fruit. Cover the fruit with water and simmer until the fruit is very soft. Cool, pour through a jelly bag or several layers of cheesecloth (muslin). Do not force the juice, as it will make it cloudy. The juice can be frozen at this stage, for later use.

To make the jelly:
4 x 8 oz cups of juice, 1 ½ sugar and lemon juice. Heat, stiring until mixture reaches 220 deg.F/ c.110 deg.C. Time between 15 – 20 mins.. Test for jellying by taking a bit of cooked solution and put on a saucer and into the freezer for a couple of minutes to see if its tender-firm. If set pour into sterile jars and seal. Put into boiling water bath for 5 mins. The jelly should firm in the jars once cold.

QUINCE JELLY 2

4 LB QUINCE
WATER
SUGAR
1 VANILLA BEAN
2 tbsp. FRESH LEMON JUICE

Use nearly ripe fruit (yellow, maybe with a tinge of green) Better pectin levels in underripe fruit. Wash, scrub the fuzz off and quarter and core the fruit. Cover the fruit and vanilla bean in a preserving pan with enough water to completely cover them. Bring to boil over medium heat, simmer stirring occasionally for about 45 mins, until the fruit is very soft. Mash the quince pulp with a potato masher and cook for another 5 mins. Remove from heat, remove vanilla bean. Pour through a jelly bag or several layers of cheesecloth (muslin). Let the juice drip through overnight. Do not force the juice, as it will make it cloudy.
Discard pulp, measure the juice (about 4 x 8 oz cups) Place in preserving pan with 6 oz sugar for every 8 oz liquid, add lemon juice. Bring to the boil over high heat, boil rapidly, stirring often for about 20 – 25 mins. Or until jelly tests done.
Remove from heat, stir and skim off foam. Pour the jelly into hot, sterilised jars, leave ½ inch head space. Seal. Process the jars in a boiling water bath for 5 mins.
NOTE: If you cannot use a vanilla bean, substitute ½ tsp. Pure vanilla extract, adding just before the jelly is poured into the jars.

QUINCE JELLY 3

6 LGE QUINCE
2 KG SUGAR
3 LT. WATER
JUICE OF 2 LEMONS

Choose (near) perfect quince, was to remove the fuzz. LEAVE WHOLE. Make a syrup by stirring the sugar into the water until dissolved, add the quince and lemon juice. Bring to the boil and cook until the jelly will set when tested.
Remove the quince carefully and pour the jelly into warmed jars and seal.
(Eat the fruit warm or cold with cream).
The jelly is a deep rose colour.

Plum and Mint Jelly

3 lb dark cooking plumbs
¾ pint water
¼ pint red wine vinegar
8 oz light brown sugar
6 tablespoons finely chopped water mint

Wipe the plums, with a sharp knife slit each one all round. Put the plums into a preserving pan with the water and vinegar. Bring to the boil and simmer gently for 45 mins. So that they are soft, turning occasionally, Mash them down as they soften. Remove any stones that come to the surface.
Strain the plums through a scalded jelly bag and leave to drip until all juice is through about 2 hours. Measure the juice. Weigh the same amount of sugar and warm in a low oven.
Put the juice into a clean pan and bring it to the boil, add the sugar and stir until dissolved. Bring the juice to the boil and boil until it reached setting point.
Take the pan from the heat and stir in the mint. Cool the jelly to lukewarm and stir it again to distribute the mint evenly. Pour into warm pots. Cover. When cold seal.
Makes 12 oz.

Rowen Jelly

4 lb rowen berries
2 lb crab apples or cooking apples
1 lemon
2 inches cinnamon stick
1 teaspoon cloves
1 lb light brown sugar for every pint of juice

Wash the rowen berries; roughly chop the apples without peeling. Put into a preserving pan with the lemon rind and juice, cinnamon and cloves. Pour in the water to just cover them. Bring to the boil and simmer until the berries and apples are very soft, about 1 hour.
Turn the fruit into a jelly bag and let drip. Can be left overnight.
Measure the juice and return to a cleaned pan. Add the sugar and stir on a low heat until it is dissolved. Bring the juice to the boil and boil rapidly until setting point is reached. Pour into small warmed pots and cover with waxed paper. Cover completely when cold.
Makes 2 lb.

Spiced Damson Jelly

2 lb damsons
¼ pint water
½ pint red wine vinegar
2 teaspoons black peppercorns
2 teaspoons allspice berries
2 dried red chillies
12 oz light brown sugar

Slit the damsons all round with a sharp knife and put them into a saucepan with the water, vinegar and spices. Bring them gently to the boil and simmer for 40 mins. To a very juicy pulp.
Strain the pulp through a jelly bag. Measure the juice and return to cleaned pan. Stir in 1 lb sugar to every pint juice. Stir until dissolved and bring to boil. Boil until setting point is reached.
Pour the jelly into warmed jars, cover with waxed paper. Cover completely when cold.
Makes 1 lb.

HONEY

QUINCE HONEY

16 OZ GRATED QUINCE
16 OZ GRATED GRANNY SMITH APPLES
4 LB SUGAR
1 PINT WATER

Wash and pare quince and apples. Core and cut into quarters. Grate or grind both fruits and mix together. Add the measured water to fruit and bring to boil.
Add sugar gradually and stir until all is dissolved.
Cook slowly, stirring frequently until fruit is clear and mixture thick, about 20 mins.
Pour into sterilised jars and seal.
The honey is the consistency of jam, heavy with fruit. Cool and store (May be stored in freezer, if not sealed) Delicious on warm biscuits or toast
Makes 5 pints.

CHAPTERS

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